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Units of Measurement for Cooking in Recipes

Updated: Jan 31

units-measurement-for-cooking
Units of Measurement for Cooking in Recipes

  • How many times has it happened to you that you take a recipe from your mother or grandmother and get “precise” kitchen measurements: you put roughly, add enough or is that my cup of coffee oil, milk, or sugar? Thus, certainly begins the agony of imprecisely guessing the required amounts of ingredients without which most recipes fail, especially when it comes to cakes.

  • The kitchen measures in the recipes must be strictly followed if you want to cook the dish you envisioned. It is not easier to guess the measurements without a scale, when everything comes down to spoons, glasses, and cups. Then the general confusion is joined by foreign measuring units for cooking, about which we know nothing, so every cake preparation is preceded by a serious calculation and internet search.

  • Cooking measures can be a real lifesaver, and these tips and tricks to make it easier to deal with measurements and measurements in recipes, which you can read below, will also help you.

  • It should be kept in mind when we use measurements without a scale, which quantities in grams are involved, whether it is liquids, measuring flour, measuring sugar or the famous measuring of flour with a spoon.

Here is an accurate guide to what amounts are meant and when it comes to vegetables, fruit, butter or dried fruit.


General units of measurement

  • 3 small spoons = 1 large spoon

  • 1 small spoon = 1/3 large spoon

  • 1 small glass = 100 g of water or wine

  • 1 large glass = 200 g of water or wine

Liquids like water, milk, wine

  • 1 spoon = 17 g

  • 7 large spoons of water = 100ml

  • 1 teaspoon = 8 g

  • 1 wine glass = 100 g

  • 1 glass of water = 200 g

  • 1 cup = 250 g

  • 1 deep plate = 350 g

Measurements for hard flour

  • 1 level teaspoon = 3 g

  • 1 full teaspoon = 8 g

  • 1 level spoon = 8 g

  • 1 full spoon = 25 g

  • 1 cup = 50-80 g

  • 1 cup = 130-150 g

  • ¼ cup = 32 g

  • 1/3 cup = 43 g

  • 2/3 cup = 85 g

  • ¾ cup = 96 g

  • 1 cup = 136 g

Measurements for soft flour

  • 1 level teaspoon = 3 g

  • 1 full teaspoon = 7 g

  • 1 level spoon = 12 g

  • 1 full spoon = 20 g

  • 1 cup = 65-100 g

  • 1 cup = 160-180 g

  • ¼ cup = 32 g

  • 1/3 cup = 43 g

  • 2/3 cup = 85 g

  • ¾ cup = 96 g

  • 1 cup = 136 g

Measures for powdered sugar

  • 1 level teaspoon = 3 g

  • 1 full teaspoon = 8 g

  • 1 level spoon = 12.5 g

  • 1 full spoon = 25 g

  • 1 cup = 125 g

  • 1 cup = 300 g

  • ¼ cup = 32 g

  • 1/3 cup = 43 g

  • 2/3 cup = 85 g

  • ¾ cup = 96 g

  • 1 cup = 136 g

Measures for crystal sugar

  • 1 level teaspoon = 4 g

  • 1 full teaspoon = 10 g

  • 1 level spoon = 12.5 g

  • 1 full spoon = 25 g

  • 1 cup = 125 g

  • 1 cup = 300 g

  • ¼ cup = 50 g

  • 1/3 cup = 67 g

  • ½ cup = 100 g

  • 2/3 cup = 134 g

  • ¾ cup = 150 g

  • 1 cup = 201 g

Measures for brown sugar

  • ¼ cup = 55g

  • 1/3 cup = 73g

  • ½ cup = 110g

  • 1 cup = 220g

  • 1 cube of sugar = 5 g

Measures for rice — uncooked, white, brown

  • 1 flat spoon 30 g

  • 1 cup 120 g

  • 1 cup 300 g

Butter measures

In the solid state:

  • 1 level spoon = 14 g

In liquid state:

  • 1 level spoon = 12 g

  • 1 cup of butter = 227 g

  • ¼ cup of butter = 57 g

  • 1/3 cup of butter = 76 g

  • ½ cup of butter = 113 g


  • Most packages of butter of 200 g and larger have exactly marked divisions on the package, which indicate the grammage, so you can use them to cut the butter over the paper.

  • Use the contact form for questions or advice.

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