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All about Maple Syrup

Updated: Feb 14

  • Maple syrup is a natural sweetener, but much more than that. There are several natural sweeteners that are preferred instead of chemically processed sugar, which is common in most people who take care of their diet and health. There are people who like to use honey instead of all other natural products of the same type. However, maple syrup is considered to be an even better option compared to honey, as it has fewer calories. One of the most popular and healthiest sweeteners today is maple syrup. It is a 100% natural sweetener in the form of a syrup, which is known to be of course much more nutritious and healthier than sugar. The syrup is made on the spot, in the old-fashioned way, and contains about 2 percent sugar. It has a sweet taste and a specific smell and is used in the household, but also in the industry for making cakes and various sweets. During a certain period of the year it is not possible to get the juice from the maple tree, which is manifested by the curliness of its leaves. In order to obtain about 3.5 liters of pure syrup of standard quality, it is necessary to boil about 150 liters of maple juice.

  • Although all types of maple contain sweet juice, special types of this tree (Acer saccharum) that contain the most sugar are used to obtain syrup (so-called "sapa"). During the winter, in January and February, and in periods when temperatures: oscillate from low at night to relatively high during the day, in places where the maple tree is cut, sap is released which drips in drops and collects in pots. The syrup is then boiled to a density similar to that of rare honey. The caloric value is 275 kilocalories. It is used precisely as a substitute for sugar and honey. It has a pleasant, sweet taste, its color is dark brown, and it is of medium density.


It replaces sugar

  • Using maple syrup can flush toxins out of the body, cleanse the kidneys and the entire digestive system, reduce the pressure that toxins put on nerves, arteries and blood vessels, and maintain a youthful appearance. The good news is that pure maple syrup can worthily replace sugar, but also harmful artificial sweeteners because it is rich in vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols – antioxidants.

  • Research on the effect of maple syrup on liver health was conducted on rats. Which after 11 days of obtaining pure maple syrup had significantly lower levels of liver enzymes (AST, LDH and ALT) in the blood, standard indicators of liver function.

  • Liver disease is most commonly associated with alcohol consumption, but it also occurs in obese middle-aged people with abnormal blood fat levels and diabetes.

Maple syrup contains:

  • 65% of dry matter, in which the most abundant carbohydrates are in the form of mono, oligo and polysaccharides and pectin sugars. The most common monosaccharides are fructose and glucose in equivalent ratios, and arabinose and galactose in small amounts. Oligosaccharides are present in small amounts ranging from 0.0001 to 0.1 percent, namely raffinose, ketosis, planteose, and stachyose. Pectin sugars have a high degree of thermolability, so they are present in the juice from 4.8 to 9.7 percent, and in the maple syrup itself from 0.008 to 0.1 percent.

  • Although all types of maple contain sweet juice, special types of this tree (Acer saccharum) that contain the most sugar are used to make syrup (so-called "sapa").

  • During the winter, in January and February, and in periods when temperatures oscillate from low at night to relatively high during the day, in places where the maple tree is cut, sap is released which drips in drops and collects in pots.

  • The syrup is then boiled to a density similar to that of rare honey. The caloric value is 275 kilocalories. It is used precisely as a substitute for sugar and honey. It has a pleasant, sweet taste, its color is dark brown, and it is of medium density.

  • The syrup is made on the spot, in the old-fashioned way, and contains about 2 percent sugar. It has a sweet taste and a specific smell and is used in the household, but also in the industry for making cakes and various sweets. During a certain period of the year it is not possible to get the juice from the maple tree, which is manifested by the curliness of its leaves. In order to obtain about 3.5 liters of pure syrup of standard quality, it is necessary to boil about 150 liters of maple juice.

Storage and use of syrup

  • A closed container with maple syrup at room temperature can stand up to a year without losing quality. This is partly why maple syrup is highly valued as a food or natural sweetener. A sign of the beginning of spoilage of the syrup is the appearance of a thin layer on its surface (similar to jam). But it can be carefully removed, and the syrup becomes usable again. Interestingly, maple syrup will not harden at low temperatures. It can be spread on bread, placed on pancakes or used to pour over fruit salads and biscuit cakes.

Maple syrup contains 24 different antioxidants

  • Oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms behind aging and many diseases. It consists of unwanted chemical reactions that include free radicals, ie molecules with unstable electrons.

  • Antioxidants are substances that can neutralize free radicals and reduce damage due to oxidative stress, potentially reducing the risk of some diseases.

  • Several studies have shown that maple syrup is a significant source of antioxidants. One study showed that there are as many as 24 different antioxidant substances in maple syrup.

  • Darker syrups (like Class B) contain more of these beneficial antioxidants than lighter maple syrups.

  • However, as with minerals, the total amount of antioxidants is still low compared to large amounts of sugar.

Health benefits of maple syrup

  • Because it has pronounced antioxidant properties, maple syrup prevents cell damage due to oxidative stress

  • Improves heart health

  • Improves male reproductive health

  • Strengthens the immune system.

How is maple syrup used?

  • Toast one slice of bread made from wheat flour and put some fruit on it, like a banana or an apple, which you have previously chopped. Sprinkle with cinnamon powder, then pour over a little maple syrup and enjoy. That would be just one example of how maple syrup is used, for everything else indulge your imagination.

Maple syrup can be used as a sweetener for tea or coffee.


Note Caution: In addition to organic acids (citric, oxalic and malic), inorganic acids such as phosphoric (40%), sulfuric (13%) and hydrochloric acid (5.8%) are also present. They, given their concentration in the syrup, can be very harmful and adversely affect the body of users of products made from maple syrup. Namely, they can damage tissues, cause allergic reactions and irritations of the digestive system, and a number of other unfavorable symptoms.

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